How would a Swiss Army knife look if it were a tiny house

Author channel Kirsten Dirksen   12 month ago
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WA maker turns skoolie, short-bus & container into family home

Seven years ago, Jeremy and Mira Thompson quit their jobs and sold their suburban home to hit the road in a short-bus they’d converted into a mobile home. After a year on the road, they’d gone through their savings and were thinking about starting a family. Now living on family property in rural Washington they bought a full-sized school bus at auction. This time they stripped away the metal behind the cab and embedded a wooden cottage inside their new vehicle. Jeremy used his experience as an auto body mechanic and recent education in architectural drafting to design their conversions. He had also turned his carpentry into paid work and needed a workshop. After finding a very affordable container - one that had been tagged as scrap-, Jeremy began to convert it into a wooden clad (on 3 sides) office with a green roof. Thompson Creative: https://www.facebook.com/theVonThompsonCreative/ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC9WKX3qBnZ7aDgxl6lDKl6w Original story: https://faircompanies.com/videos/wa-maker-turns-skoolie-short-bus-container-into-home-office/

Fluid NYC flat uses sliding furniture to create 3 rooms in 1

Russian architect Peter Kostelov and his artist wife, Olga Feshina, wanted private rooms to work from home in their aging New York City apartment so they tore down the interior walls and rebuilt the 700-square-foot space with not just a living room, kitchen, bathroom and master bedroom, but two flex spaces which serve for work and guests (via slide-out beds). With the help of Kostelov’s carpenter father Vladimir (who flew in from Russia to help) they used plywood to craft sliding tables, benches and beds, as well as cabinets, closets and some walls and ceiling finishes. “This is the biggest advantage of plywood: you can make shapes that are custom made… this is how you can save your budget and use as much space as you can." In Peter’s office- a plywood-covered cocoon-, he raised the bed to leave room for a table to slide underneath from the adjacent living room. Crafted from just one four-by-eight piece of plywood, it slides out of the wall and can be adjusted to serve as a table-for-two, dining for 12, a drafting space (for Peter) and fabric-cutting surface (for Olia). The matching plywood benches slide out to match and open for horizontal storage. In the kitchen, there’s a breakfast table that folds down from the brick wall, as well as two plywood cantilevered stools that appear fragile, but hold up to 330 pounds (thanks to the yacht hardware and long anchor pins). Peter's architecture: http://www.kostelov.ru/what/e_house_133.html Olga's art: http://www.olgafeshina.com

LA coliving: PodShare's permeable intersection between social/privacy

Calling it “a social network with an address”, Los Angeles entrepreneur Elvina Beck created PodShare, a coliving experiment where dozens of “Podestrians”- travelers, mobile workers or new arrivals to the city- share a communal space filled with sleeping pods or “bunk beds for adults”. Beck, who built the first PodShare in 2012 with her father, wanted to respond to her demographic’s rejection of widespread home ownership and embrace of the sharing economy. She set out to transform the American bunk bed, creating a more open (and co-ed) version of the Japanese capsule hotels. For $40 to $50 per night (or discounted weekly and monthly prices), Podestrians can choose a bottom or top sleeping pod (equipped with a lamp and a small flatscreen television with Internet access) along with all the shared spaces, including a kitchen (with communal food, and space for individual storage in the pantry and fridge), bathroom, showers (toiletries included) and a communal lounge. Currently, there are 3 locations in Los Angeles, but Beck sees the model as scalable across the country and, similar to a gym, members could have overnight access at any location. PodShare doesn’t own any of the locations, but instead rents empty space from landlords. They stay away from residentially-zoned properties and instead focus on converting commercial or live/work spaces. Beck and her partner Kera Package have evolved the pods so they are now modular and totally mobile so they can go up and down at any location when a lease ends. In reflection of the sharing economy’s privilege of “access” over “ownership”, Beck tries to outfit each location with extras like bicycles and instruments. She hopes each location will eventually have bigger extras, like a gym or pool. Currently, the Hollywood location even has a recording studio and editing bay. PodShare http://podshare.co/ Original story: https://faircompanies.com/videos/la-coliving-a-permeable-intersection-between-socialprivacy/

How to Make Simple Survival Bread with 4 Ingredients Long Term Survival Skills

This recipe is meant for those who want to learn LONG TERM SURVIVAL Skills, NOT "Lost in the Bush" survival. A must try with your Dutch Oven. Only 4 ingredients. Every Prepper should master this skill. Become a Patreon www.patreon.com/backwoodsgourmet Please like, Subscribe, share and comment. See how we made the charcoal used in this video here. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YBuXrAYkE3k

Tiny House Collects Energy and Water

The Atlas Tiny House in Lyons, Colorado was built with the idea of being completely self-succient and off-grid. The roof boast an impression 4 kilowatt solar array, more than enough to power the home. It also collects water from the roof and then filters and stores it in the "belly" of the home. For sale here: https://tinyhouselistings.com/listing/lyons-co-12-award-winning-design Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=tinyhouselistings Tiny homes listed for sale and rent daily: http://tinyhouselistings.com Tiny homes for sale in your inbox: http://eepurl.com/bAcWb Instagram: http://instagram.com/tinyhouselistings

All of the furniture and rooms in Leonardo Di Chiara’s tiny house fold, swing and pivot into the walls so when closed the space is absent of color, like a whiteboard perfect for the creative process of a young architect. Calling it aVOID in reference to the hollow shell it can morph into, Di Chiara says it’s more aspirational than a reflection of his not-yet-hyper-minimalist lifestyle,

He wanted an uncluttered lifestyle but he also wanted to be mobile and to live in a big city. His solution, to build a row house on wheels. Di Chiara has currently wedged his row house between two tiny houses on the campus of the Bauhaus Archiv in Berlin where Van Bo Le-Mentzel, designer of the "one square meter" house, has organized a tiny living experiment.

Di Chiara hopes to continue the experimenting when he moves to Milan. His idea is to create a prototype for a Migratory Neighborhood that could be replicated across Europe so urban nomads like himself could find temporary places to park their homes in schools (during the summer), parks (in winter), abandoned lots, etc. He sees it as a win win for cities eager to keep eyes on the street in isolated or temporarily unused parts of town.

aVOID Tiny House on Tour - 8000 km from Berlin to Rome: http://www.leonardodichiara.it/avoidontour/
Leonardo’s tiny-living on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/leonardo.di.chiara/
Migratory Neighborhoods and other news (Leonardo is currently collecting information from those interested in joining him): https://www.facebook.com/avoidtinyhouse/

Leonardo's collaborators:
DMM (metal covering and kitchen top), Makte (wood), Häfele (furniture hardware), iGuzzini (lights), Bosch (battery and home appliances), Omar (trailer), Giommi (windows making), Schüco (windows products), Gessi (taps and sink), BTicino (electric plugs), Noctis (mattress and pillows), Mottura (curtains), FG Arredamenti (carpenter for interior), Subissati (wooden structure), Faber (induction stove and kitchen hood), Legnotech (structure construction), ICA (bio paintings), Ambivalent (foldable chairs), G.R. (electrician), Vitrifrigo (fridge), Al-Ko (trailer equipments), Se.Pa (mirror and lamp next to bed), Fratelli Guzzini (plates, cutlery, etc), Alluflon (pans pots coffee machine), Beltrami (sleeping bag, towels, etc).

Original story: https://faircompanies.com/videos/tiny-home-triggers-rooms-and-furniture-from-walls-as-required/

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