How would a Swiss Army knife look if it were a tiny house

Author channel Kirsten Dirksen   10 month ago
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Couple makes garage home + campervan a consistent life combo

Bryan and Jen Danger spend most nights on the road in their converted Sprinter van, but when they’re back home in Portland, they sleep in their converted garage. They rent their 3-bedroom home (attached to the garage), as well as the garage when they’re not in town. Five years ago, the couple quit high-paying jobs (after tucking away a nest egg), rented out their home and moved into a remodeled VW van. Back in Portland after a year and a half on the road (to Central America and back), they realized their 3-bedroom home was too big for their shrunken lifestyle and they began to focus on creating shelter in their garage. Upon discovering their remodel would qualify as an ADU (Accessory Dwelling Unit), making it free from permitting fees, the couple joined a local wood-and-metal-working shop (Bryan learned to weld) and began to craft the old parking into a 480-square-foot home. Using mostly recycled wood and steel, they lofted their bed above storage stair unit that includes a closet, washer/drier den and a built-in TV and fireplace. With he same materials, they built floor-to-ceiling storage along one wall (they don’t use all the space). They laid the OSB floor and poured concrete into molds to create industrial countertops. A section of the counter swivels on casters to become a dining table, workspace or cocktail bar. The bathroom, the biggest room in the home, is a “wet bath” in acrylicized waterproof concrete inspired by the road trip’s outdoor showers. Not wanting to give up on travel, they sold their Westy (not reliable enough) and bought a Mercedes Sprinter van. After adding insulation and wood paneling, they dropped in temporary OSB furniture to test run on road trips. Once they were comfortable with the layout, they crafted permanent furniture in bamboo, including marine-grade off-grid refrigerator, toilet and automated retractable awning (built to withstand high winds). Today, the couple work designing small spaces for clients, and thanks to their light lifestyle, they haven’t had to return to full-time work even after 5 years on the road. Bryan and Jen's blog - https://www.thedangerz.com Their small home design. - https://www.zenboxdesign.com Sprinter van conversions - https://www.ZENVANZ.com Original story: https://faircompanies.com/videos/couple-makes-garage-home-campervan-a-consistent-life-combo

Spectacular Zen Inspired Dream Tiny House

The stunning Zen Tiny Home in Byron Bay, Australia has it all. It's spacious and beautifully designed with influence borrowed from both Japanese and Scandinavian architecture to form a wonderfully functional house on wheels. Become a Living Big Patron: https://www.patreon.com/livingbig Best of all, the tiny house has been designed to be ultra liveable, taking the needs of it's dynamic occupants into consideration. It's filled with clever storage solutions and has been beautifully finished to create a home which feels wonderful to be inside. Read More: http://www.livingbiginatinyhouse.com/the-zen-tiny-house Follow us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/livingbiginatinyhouse Follow us on Twitter: @TinyHouseNZ Follow us on Instagram: @livingbiginatinyhouse Please subscribe for more videos on tiny houses, DIY, design, and sustainable, off-grid living. Music in this video: http://www.youtube.com/brycelangston 'Living Big in a Tiny House' © 2017 Zyia Pictures Ltd

Fluid NYC flat uses sliding furniture to create 3 rooms in 1

Russian architect Peter Kostelov and his artist wife, Olga Feshina, wanted private rooms to work from home in their aging New York City apartment so they tore down the interior walls and rebuilt the 700-square-foot space with not just a living room, kitchen, bathroom and master bedroom, but two flex spaces which serve for work and guests (via slide-out beds). With the help of Kostelov’s carpenter father Vladimir (who flew in from Russia to help) they used plywood to craft sliding tables, benches and beds, as well as cabinets, closets and some walls and ceiling finishes. “This is the biggest advantage of plywood: you can make shapes that are custom made… this is how you can save your budget and use as much space as you can." In Peter’s office- a plywood-covered cocoon-, he raised the bed to leave room for a table to slide underneath from the adjacent living room. Crafted from just one four-by-eight piece of plywood, it slides out of the wall and can be adjusted to serve as a table-for-two, dining for 12, a drafting space (for Peter) and fabric-cutting surface (for Olia). The matching plywood benches slide out to match and open for horizontal storage. In the kitchen, there’s a breakfast table that folds down from the brick wall, as well as two plywood cantilevered stools that appear fragile, but hold up to 330 pounds (thanks to the yacht hardware and long anchor pins). Peter's architecture: http://www.kostelov.ru/what/e_house_133.html Olga's art: http://www.olgafeshina.com

Everyone was laughing at his HOUSE, until they went inside...

10 TINIEST HOMES OF ALL TIME One of the slogans of the Swedish company IKEA urges to think boldly. However, it would rather seem that they are far from bold thinking when all their proposals for interior design are limited to the principles of comfort and practicality. The heroes of our next video are not afraid to make bold decisions – They build houses on the water or even take them on the road with them. With that said, check out our top 8 smallest and the most comfortable houses. GREDIT: 1. Tokidoki Traveller https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAKZ2vtm_-hfqeCGTNNbZqA 2. Houseboat https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8EQAfueDGNeqb1ALm0LjHA 3. The Wandering Wagners https://youtu.be/KElnBjcvSgk?t=26s 4. Living Big In A Tiny House https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoNTMWgGuXtGPLv9UeJZwBw 5. Expedition Happiness https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDfAt3KEBpjVWsDkBY_OdAg

Old silo now spaceship-esque tiny home in Berlin

After two years of living in a camper with his young daughter, architect Jan Körbes wanted something better suited to their active lifestyle, so he decided to realize a longtime dream of turning a grain silo into a microhome. With the help of his team at REFUNC, specialists in creative recycling, they bought an old grain bin from a farmer and set to work making it habitable. Working with a footprint of 4m2 (43 square feet), the group started by adding floors to the space. The final home is 3 stories and includes a climbing wall as sole means of reaching the top floor bedroom. The middle floor includes a kitchen, toilet and shower. The crew built out the final space of 13m2 with a budget of about $27,000 and lots of recycled items (including floor, ceiling and paneling). The home, an experiment in mobile living (it’s already moved once) dubbed "Silo City", fills in REFUNC’s portfolio of recycled microarchitecture which includes a mobile shelters made from shrink-wrap, pallets, a retired ski gondola and shipping containers and wind turbine blades. “This is an example of an object which is industrial which after a certain lifespan is not used any longer,” explains Körbes. “And this is when we come in. So we analyze objects which could become microarchitecture, for example this grain silo it’s actually a perfect size for a mini, mini, mini house.“ *Photo credits: Ishka Michocka, Christian van der Kooij, Jan Korbes Silo House: www.silocity.space REFUNC: http://refunc.nl

All of the furniture and rooms in Leonardo Di Chiara’s tiny house fold, swing and pivot into the walls so when closed the space is absent of color, like a whiteboard perfect for the creative process of a young architect. Calling it aVOID in reference to the hollow shell it can morph into, Di Chiara says it’s more aspirational than a reflection of his not-yet-hyper-minimalist lifestyle,

He wanted an uncluttered lifestyle but he also wanted to be mobile and to live in a big city. His solution, to build a row house on wheels. Di Chiara has currently wedged his row house between two tiny houses on the campus of the Bauhaus Archiv in Berlin where Van Bo Le-Mentzel, designer of the "one square meter" house, has organized a tiny living experiment.

Di Chiara hopes to continue the experimenting when he moves to Milan. His idea is to create a prototype for a Migratory Neighborhood that could be replicated across Europe so urban nomads like himself could find temporary places to park their homes in schools (during the summer), parks (in winter), abandoned lots, etc. He sees it as a win win for cities eager to keep eyes on the street in isolated or temporarily unused parts of town.

aVOID on tour - Berlin to Rome, April-June 2018 (tiny talks, house visits...): http://www.leonardodichiara.it/avoidontour/

aVOID: www.leonardodichiara.it/
Migratory Neighborhoods (Leonardo is currently collecting information from those interested in joining hi.m): https://www.facebook.com/pg/migratoryneighborhood/

Leonardo's collaborators:
DMM (metal covering and kitchen top), Makte (wood), Häfele (furniture hardware), iGuzzini (lights), Bosch (battery and home appliances), Omar (trailer), Giommi (windows making), Schüco (windows products), Gessi (taps and sink), BTicino (electric plugs), Noctis (mattress and pillows), Mottura (curtains), FG Arredamenti (carpenter for interior), Subissati (wooden structure), Faber (induction stove and kitchen hood), Legnotech (structure construction), ICA (bio paintings), Ambivalent (foldable chairs), G.R. (electrician), Vitrifrigo (fridge), Al-Ko (trailer equipments), Se.Pa (mirror and lamp next to bed), Fratelli Guzzini (plates, cutlery, etc), Alluflon (pans pots coffee machine), Beltrami (sleeping bag, towels, etc).

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