Thoreauvian simple living: unelectrified, timeless tiny home

Author channel Kirsten Dirksen   7 year ago
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Mortgage-free, tiny home on a housekeeper's salary

Johnny Sanphillippo has never made more than $20,000 per year (he works as a housekeeper, as well as, a gardener and house painter), but he knew like "any other American" that he wanted to own his own home. When he talked to bankers about qualifying for a home loan, "they look at you and their eyes glaze over and you realize, they're going to give me a lollipop and send me home, which is pretty much what happened". So he decided that if he went far enough away from his hometown of San Francisco he could find something he could afford to buy with cash. He finally heard about a deal in Hawaii (back when oil was cheap and airline tickets were $99 from SFO) and for $3000 cash he bought himself an empty lot in a failed subdivision on the Big Island. Without a loan, he knew he couldn't afford to build a conventional home. He'd always loved tiny houses, but the permitting office wasn't as enthusiastic about allowing him to build small. So he had plans drawn up for a conventionally-sized home, plus a 400 square foot garage. He just built the garage. Once the inspectors signed off on his fully-equipped garage (which included a bathroom, utility sink, electricity, septic system and rainwater capture), he let them know he wasn't planning on building the house. Then he set about swapping the garage door for sliding glass and the utility sink for a regular kitchen. Instead of relying on a loan to buy a house up-front, he had to do it the slow way, in stops and starts as he worked to pay off he step of the process. First, he saved up for a foundation, then the shell, then septic, etcetera and today, 13 years later, the home is complete. Johnny Sanphillippo's blog: http://granolashotgun.com/ Original story & more info: http://faircompanies.com/videos/view/mortgage-free-tiny-home-on-a-housekeepers-salary/

Paris microflat gets precise in space use with thrifty ideas

On a nurse’s salary, Flore Devaux knew buying a home in Paris would be difficult so when she stumbled upon a tiny flat near Montmartre within her price range, she was thrilled by every centimeter of the 18.76 square meters place (201.9 square feet). Armed with a drill kit and plenty of recycled materials, Flore- and her boyfriend Florian Moulin- built out plenty of storage space and custom furniture to make the space work for her: old wood boxes became book shelves; a drawer salvaged from the curb became under-the-bed storage; wheels added to an old steam trunk created a mobile coffee table with storage. Inspired by the efficiency of boats (and her marine father), Flore, and Florian, created a storage bench to provide seating for 4 to 5 guests and lots of storage. The kitchen is small, but large enough for an under-the-counter refrigerator (no freezer), compact washing machine (two drying racks can be set up in the bathroom), and a toaster oven (supported by the base of a hacked IKEA drying rack). Florian's furniture designs: florianmoulincrea.tumblr.com Original story: https://faircompanies.com/videos/paris-microflat-gets-precise-in-space-use-with-thrifty-ideas/

Life Lessons From 100-Year-Olds

We asked three centenarians what their most valuable life lessons were, and also their regrets. The conversations that followed were remarkable. They talked about the importance of family, people, relationships and love. Their view on life, as an elderly citizen with a lot of experience is truly an inspiration and motivation. Enjoy the video! Click here to subscribe to LifeHunters: http://bit.ly/2gFMyln http://www.lifehunters.com https://www.facebook.com/Lifehunters Executive producer: LifeHunters Producer: Marcel IJzerman UK Producer: Anna Snowball Director: Chris de Krijger Script: Marcel IJzerman / Chris de Krijger Camera: Marcel IJzerman Sound recording: Tjeerd Melchers Interviews: Anna Snowball Editor: Marcel IJzerman Sound engineering: Tjeerd Melchers Music: Federico Durand Thanks to: The Birchwood Grange, Cliff Crozier, John Denerley, Emelia Harper, Leslie Masters, Ruby Martin.

Japan's independent kids I The Feed

By Western standards, Japanese culture emphasises independence and self-reliance from an extraordinarily young age. Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SBS2Australia Twitter: https://twitter.com/sbs2 Tumblr: http://sbs2australia.tumblr.com/

Why Denmark is the Happiest Country

To learn how happiness is a choice rather than something to pursue, you may be interested in Prof G's book "Authentic Happiness in Seven Emails" - http://amzn.to/2ml94yz. Professor Galindo uses this video on Why Denmark is the Happiest Country as prompt for discussions in his Philosophy and Humanities courses. For Speaking Engagements - http://www.javygalindo.com/contact-me/ **Prof G Books** +Authentic Happiness in Seven Emails (Audiobook) - http://amzn.to/2lUCb0h +The Power of Thinking Differently (Kindle/Paperback) -http://amzn.to/2mTPNIE +The Happiness Habit (ebook) - http://goo.gl/Yb73XS **Follow Prof G** +Website - http://www.javygalindo.com +FB - http://www.facebook.com/javywg +Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/jwgthink

Seven years ago Diana and Michael Lorence moved to a 12-foot-square home without electricity in the coastal mountains of Northern California. 
They're not back-to-the-land types- they're not growing their own food, nor raising animals-, but, like Thoreau, they were looking for a place where they could get away from the noise of society and focus on their inner lives.
For nearly 30 years they have lived in tiny houses, often in guest homes, though their current abode is the smallest and most fitting their needs. It was designed by Michael based on their experiences living in nearly 20 tiny homes across the country before finally settling here. 
They don't have electricity nor any other type of alternative energy (i.e. solar power). They don't have a refrigerator so they eat a lot of vegetables, fruits, grains and nuts. 
There's also no oven, but Diana says she doesn't bake anyway and she cooks their meals with their one cast iron pot over the fire. The fire is also their source of hot water, heat and light (in addition to candles).
The Lorences are a private couple, but recently they have begun to speak out more about their lives in hopes of showing others that options such as theirs exist.
Until now, the couple has turned down requests appear on video, not wanting to be categorized as simply another couple choosing to live in a tiny space. So I was pleasantly surprised when Diana and Michael agreed to let me visit their home with my camera.

Original story here: http://www.faircompanies.com/videos/view/thoreauvian-simple-living-unelectrified-timeless-tiny-home/

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