Thoreauvian simple living: unelectrified, timeless tiny home

Author channel Kirsten Dirksen   7 year ago
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Dan Price’s underground home, art & philosophy on $5,000/year

When Dan Price returned to his home state of Oregon in 1990 he was determined to avoid mortgages or rent (he and his family had just finished caretaking a mansion with a heating bill of $500/month). He found an unused meadow in Joseph, Oregon and began renting it from his neighbors for $100/year (in exchange for cleaning downed trees and repairing fences). His first underground structure was actually built to shelter his home/office, namely his copy machine, essential for publishing his zine “Moonlight Chronicles” which he started in 1992 (it was sponsored by Simple Shoes for a decade). www.moonlightchronicles.com In his meadow paradise, Price now also has an underground "hobbit hole" style home, as well as, a composting toilet, a propane-powered shower (using river water) and a pine wood propane sauna. He’s not hooked up to city water (he discovered a spring on the property), but he’s hooked up to the grid and it’s been approved by the county and city. Original story: http://faircompanies.com/videos/view/dan-prices-underground-home-art-philosophy-on-5000year/

Woman fits her life into a 200 sq ft apt - Small Spaces video

Suzi West helps people take what they already have and stage it within their home. Her 200 sq ft apartment is a testament to amazing interior design. Get inspired. Tiny, Eclectic, Amazing Spaces celebrates big design in unique and tiny spaces. This series is produced by SPACEStv - a YouTube original Home + Design channel. Watch more on SPACEStv Subscribe at http://www.YouTube.com/SPACEStv Follow us at http://www.twitter.com/SPACEStv Friend us at http://www.facebook.com/SPACEStv Pin with us at http://www.Pinterest.com.SPACEStv See more photos at http://SPACEStv.tumblr.com

I Quit The City To Build My Hobbit House | HOMES ON THE EDGE

SUBSCRIBE to Barcroft TV: http://bit.ly/Oc61Hj GOING off-grid is something many dream of, but one former Londoner has actually followed through on his dream of living in a self-built house in the woods. Kris Harbour, 31, gave up his job, house, a flat he owned, and a busy social life to move onto a plot of land in the welsh countryside, which he bought on Ebay. Once there, using recycled, natural, and found materials, he began building his own round cobwood house from scratch, in which he now lives full-time. Kris told Barcroft Media: “The idea of working for two thirds of your life and having very little time to socialise and do hobbies, it just doesn’t sit right. Kris documents his project on his YouTube channel at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC5rT7F0PGNuD54rJ9kzgWzw Video Credits: Videographer / director: Marcus Hessenberg Producer: Joe Roberts, James Thorne Editor: James Thorne Barcroft TV: https://www.youtube.com/user/barcroftmedia/featured Barcroft Animals: https://www.youtube.com/barcroftanimals/featured Barcroft Cars: https://www.youtube.com/user/BarcroftCars/featured For more of the amazing side of life: For the full story, visit BARCROFT.TV: http://www.barcroft.tv/ Like @BarcroftTV on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BarcroftTV Follow @Barcroft_TV on Twitter: https://www.Twitter.com/Barcroft_TV Check out more videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/barcroftmedia/videos Download Barcroft TV on iOS: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/barcroft-tv/id1287734327?mt=8 Download Barcroft TV on Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.recipe.barcroft&hl=en

Plants & rugged materials turn Alpine garage into dream shed

When architects Gianmatteo Romegialli and Erika Gaggia saw their friend Carlo “Dino” Marchetti’s garage with the gorgeous views of the Italian Alps, “almost as a joke” they suggested converting it into something “fun”. Given Dino’s passion for gardening, they decided to let nature in on the renovation. By creating just a steel frame around the building, they enabled local plants and vines to wrap the home in a second skin of vegetation. Inside they left most of the cement masonry and added raw, industrial materials like galvanized steel to create a kitchen and window frames. Adding just a hole in one wall- between the old garage and former storage room- they expanded the space into a second room for relaxing, entertaining and planning and potting the garden. Perched high above the province of Sondrio in the Raethian Alps, “Green Box” is shaped like a conventional home, but it’s the plants that give it the gable-roofed shape. The architects (of Act_Romegialli) used simple glazed panels and simple joinery to create a structure with the feel of a lived-in greenhouse. Like any living structure, the home changes with the seasons to match the nature that surrounds it. Act_romegialli http://www.actromegialli.it/ Original story: https://faircompanies.com/videos/plants-rugged-materials-turn-alpine-garage-into-dream-shed/

Family of 7 Living Completely Off-Grid in Northern Canada!

In this video, we meet Jeff, Rose, and their 5 girls who are living completely off grid on a 40-acre piece of land in Northern British Columbia, Canada. They built their own off-grid house for less than $25,000 with cedar posts sunk into the ground like a pole barn, log rafters, plywood, foam insulation, and a living roof. The house was so affordable to build because they didn't have to excavate or pour a concrete foundation, dig a well, or install a septic system. They have 2 solar power systems to power everything they need. The first solar system is just one solar panel that generates 12-Volt power for their lights, cell phones, and music player. The larger system is a 2.5 Kilowatt solar power system installed on their shop roof with a lithium ion battery bank that powers their full-sized fridge, a chest freezer, washing machine, as well as a mixer, blender and a toaster. They have a backup generator but they only have to use it for about 40 hours per year during prolonged cloudy or snowy periods. All of the water the family uses is rainwater collected from their shop roof and stored in a tank under the shop floor to keep it cool. They carry buckets of water into the house for cooking, dishes and showers. To produce clean drinking water, they filter their rainwater in a passive water filter called a Burkey (check them out here: http://www.berkeyfilters.com). The grey water from their kitchen sink and shower drains into a shallow grey water field in the backyard. They have 2 composting bucket toilets and they sprinkle sawdust into the buckets after each use to absorb moisture and prevent smells. For heat, they cut their own firewood for their Blaze King catalytic wood stove, and for their antique cookstove in the kitchen that they use for cooking and baking. Jeff and Rose homeschool their 5 girls for a few hours each day and also ensure that their kids are learning diverse life skills like growing their own food, caring for horses, raising bees, and more. We're very impressed with the clever solutions this family has come up with to make off-grid living seem so easy. If you want to learn more about this inspiring family and follow their journey, check out their Gridlessness project — they have a blog and a YouTube channel. Gridlessness YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UClt1rDdFd-VUX8VXmWummSQ Gridlessness Blog: http://gridlessness.com Thanks for watching! Mat & Danielle ------------------------------------------------------------- STAY IN TOUCH! ------------------------------------------------------------ Blog: www.exploringalternatives.ca Facebook: /exploringalternativesblog Instagram: @exploringalternatives Music & Song Credits: All music in this video was composed, performed, and recorded by Mat Dubé of Exploring Alternatives.

Seven years ago Diana and Michael Lorence moved to a 12-foot-square home without electricity in the coastal mountains of Northern California. 
They're not back-to-the-land types- they're not growing their own food, nor raising animals-, but, like Thoreau, they were looking for a place where they could get away from the noise of society and focus on their inner lives.
For nearly 30 years they have lived in tiny houses, often in guest homes, though their current abode is the smallest and most fitting their needs. It was designed by Michael based on their experiences living in nearly 20 tiny homes across the country before finally settling here. 
They don't have electricity nor any other type of alternative energy (i.e. solar power). They don't have a refrigerator so they eat a lot of vegetables, fruits, grains and nuts. 
There's also no oven, but Diana says she doesn't bake anyway and she cooks their meals with their one cast iron pot over the fire. The fire is also their source of hot water, heat and light (in addition to candles).
The Lorences are a private couple, but recently they have begun to speak out more about their lives in hopes of showing others that options such as theirs exist.
Until now, the couple has turned down requests appear on video, not wanting to be categorized as simply another couple choosing to live in a tiny space. So I was pleasantly surprised when Diana and Michael agreed to let me visit their home with my camera.

Original story here: http://www.faircompanies.com/videos/view/thoreauvian-simple-living-unelectrified-timeless-tiny-home/

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