Vipp Shelter tiny prefab as precise industrial-era appliance

Author channel Kirsten Dirksen   3 year ago
5,252,609 views

59,701 Like   1,870 Dislike

40ft Shipping Containers Transformed Into Amazing Off-Grid Family Home

This amazing small home has been built using two 40ft high cube shipping containers, slightly of-set from one another to create a stunning, off-the-grid family home. Become a Living Big Patron: https://www.patreon.com/livingbig Feeling inspired to downsize after watching tiny home and small house design videos online, this couple decided to take the plunge into designing and building a shipping container home for their family to reduce their expenses and be able to dedicate more time to the things that really matter. You can find our more about this tiny home on our website: http://www.livingbiginatinyhouse.com/off-grid-twin-40ft-shipping-container-home/ This off-grid container home is completely solar powered, with a huge solar array producing more than enough power for the small house. It's water is collected from a nearby bore. Otto Engineering: http://www.ottoengineering.co.nz/ Follow us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/livingbiginatinyhouse/ Follow us on Twitter: @TinyHouseNZ Follow us on Instagram: @livingbiginatinyhouse Please subscribe for more videos on tiny houses, DIY, design, and sustainable, off-grid living. Music in this video: http://www.youtube.com/brycelangston 'Living Big in a Tiny House' © 2018 Zyia Pictures Ltd

Couple makes garage home + campervan a consistent life combo

Bryan and Jen Danger spend most nights on the road in their converted Sprinter van, but when they’re back home in Portland, they sleep in their converted garage. They rent their 3-bedroom home (attached to the garage), as well as the garage when they’re not in town. Five years ago, the couple quit high-paying jobs (after tucking away a nest egg), rented out their home and moved into a remodeled VW van. Back in Portland after a year and a half on the road (to Central America and back), they realized their 3-bedroom home was too big for their shrunken lifestyle and they began to focus on creating shelter in their garage. Upon discovering their remodel would qualify as an ADU (Accessory Dwelling Unit), making it free from permitting fees, the couple joined a local wood-and-metal-working shop (Bryan learned to weld) and began to craft the old parking into a 480-square-foot home. Using mostly recycled wood and steel, they lofted their bed above storage stair unit that includes a closet, washer/drier den and a built-in TV and fireplace. With he same materials, they built floor-to-ceiling storage along one wall (they don’t use all the space). They laid the OSB floor and poured concrete into molds to create industrial countertops. A section of the counter swivels on casters to become a dining table, workspace or cocktail bar. The bathroom, the biggest room in the home, is a “wet bath” in acrylicized waterproof concrete inspired by the road trip’s outdoor showers. Not wanting to give up on travel, they sold their Westy (not reliable enough) and bought a Mercedes Sprinter van. After adding insulation and wood paneling, they dropped in temporary OSB furniture to test run on road trips. Once they were comfortable with the layout, they crafted permanent furniture in bamboo, including marine-grade off-grid refrigerator, toilet and automated retractable awning (built to withstand high winds). Today, the couple work designing small spaces for clients, and thanks to their light lifestyle, they haven’t had to return to full-time work even after 5 years on the road. Bryan and Jen's blog - https://www.thedangerz.com Their small home design. - https://www.zenboxdesign.com Sprinter van conversions - https://www.ZENVANZ.com Original story: https://faircompanies.com/videos/couple-makes-garage-home-campervan-a-consistent-life-combo

Capsule hotel, ancient city: sleeping in a Kyoto pod for $40

In the late ‘70s, Metabolist architect Kisho Kurokawa (designer of the Nakagin capsule tower) dreamt up “a hotel for 2001”. The idea was to do away with rooms and implement simple crawl spaces for sleeping. Today the capsule hotel concept is well-known in Japan. Originally popularized by businesspeople who missed the last train, these sleeping pods have been given a sleeker makeover. Located near Kyoto’s Gion (the traditional geisha district), 9 Hours has re-developed the capsule concept befitting the iPhone generation: the pods are minimal, functional and easy to use (thanks to the icons on the walls and floors). The *faircompanies family spent a night in these affordable ($40/night) pods and found these sleep crawl spaces (220 cm long by 108 cm wide and high) surprisingly spacious (even for sharing with a toddler). Original story: http://faircompanies.com/videos/view/capsule-hotel-ancient-city-sleeping-in-a-kyoto-pod-for-40/

Artist builds his Savannah studio with shipping containers

Architect, artist, designer Julio Garcia had been designing plans for shipping container homes for a decade before he found the perfect place to build one: on a long, narrow stretch of his property in Savannah, Georgia. “I’m a big believer we should be adapting to the environment… I remember walking out and looking at the yard and thinking oh my god the land is calling for this linear design.” He picked up two 40 foot shipping containers from the Port of Savannah and, thanks to much advance planning, he was able to install them without removing one tree from his property. He offset the two boxes, cut out the interior container walls and added I-beams, a shed roof and clerestory windows in the center to provide plenty of daylighting. “There’s nothing worse than feeling like you’re inside a container so in the design we had to address that. I’ve been in a couple of projects and they don’t function very well and you’re like, ‘Oh, I still feel like I’m in a metal box’.” Garcia believes containers can make for affordable homes: “you could put up a structure like this for about 50K”, but much of the interior was salvaged from other job sites (i.e. the drywall and the kitchen). His Price Street Projects creates plans that are “almost do-it-yourself plans” for shipping container homes and he has installed commercial container spaces, but he’s a big believer that the site should determine the design. http://pricestreetprojects.com/ Original story: https://faircompanies.com/videos/artist-builds-his-savannah-studio-with-shipping-containers

Friends turn vacant zoo on rocky hill into hotel of glass pods

When the young group of Vivood architects discovered an abandoned animal preserve perched on a hillside in the stunning Guadalest Valley (Alicante, Spain) they knew they’d found a home for their landscape hotel. With only a year to be up and running (and an angel investor waiting), they began constructing the rooms in a factory in Valencia while simultaneously prepping the land. The design was based on a prefab concept for emergency shelters developed by Vivood founder Daniel Mayo. For the hotel, the design has morphed into wood and glass boxes on stilts that perch lightly on the land and allowing the group to use land without “developing” it. Today, the 25 suites of the Vivood Landscape Hotel rest only on a foundation of nine minimal piles that can be easily removed so the resulting resort doesn’t affect runoff or impact the land. Vivood: https://www.vivood.com/en/

The Danish company VIPP (famous for its iconic 1939 wastebasket, now in the MOMA) has created a prefab tiny home designed down to the last detail (flashlight included). Their 592-square-foot “plug and play getaway” wasn’t designed to blend into nature, but to float above it; fifty thousand pounds of glass and steel serve as a frame for the surrounding landscape.

VIPP designer Morten Bo Jensen explains that the shelter wasn’t designed as a piece of architecture, but an industrial object. The prefab structure is built in a factory and the four modules are transported by truck to the site. The shelter can be constructed in 3 to 5 days using just bolts for the modules and 9,000 screws for the steel plates.

The small prefab can house 4 people: 2 on a daybed and 2 in a loft bedroom. The floor-to-ceiling glass walls slide open and closed with mechanical rollers, designed to move the 400 or 500-kilo doors with ease. “We kind of like this idea that you just grab it and slide it open,” explains Jensen, “instead of motorized solutions that would be more different from our philosophy of very mechanical products that just last for a long time.”

https://www.vipp.com/en/shelter/the-vipp-shelter/

Original story: http://faircompanies.com/videos/view/vipp-shelter-tiny-prefab-as-precise-industrial-era-appliance/

Comments for video: