Hurricane Size Comparison 2018

Author channel RED SIDE   2 month ago
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How Big Do Hurricanes Get?

The first 500 people to sign up for Skillshare will get their first 2 months for free; http://skl.sh/reallifelore16 Get RealLifeLore T-shirts here: http://standard.tv/reallifelore Please Subscribe: http://bit.ly/2dB7VTO Animations courtesy of Josh Sherrington of Heliosphere: https://www.youtube.com/c/heliosphere Additional animations courtesy of David Powell Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RealLifeLore/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/RealLifeLore1 Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/RealLifeLore/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/joseph_pise... Subreddit is moderated by Oliver Bourdouxhe Special thanks to my Patrons: Danny Clemens, Adam Kelly, Sarah Hughes, Greg Parham, Owen, Donna Videos explaining things. Mostly over topics like history, geography, economics and science. We believe that the world is a wonderfully fascinating place, and you can find wonder anywhere you look. That is what our videos attempt to convey. Currently, I try my best to release one video every week. Bear with me :)

What Happens If You Drop a Nuclear Bomb Into a Hurricane?

Help out with hurricane disaster relief for free with Tab For a Cause: http://tab.gladly.io/r/reallifelore Please Subscribe: http://bit.ly/2dB7VTO Music is by Brandon Maahs. Check out his website and music by clicking this link: http://www.brandonmaahs.com/audio-reel Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RealLifeLore/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/RealLifeLore1 Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/RealLifeLore/ Subreddit is moderated by Oliver Bourdouxhe Special thanks to my Patrons: Juan Rodriguez, Danny Clemens, Owen, Mary-Helen Burns, Jarrell Hawkins, Conor Dillon, Donna, Michael Aufiero, Mohammad Abu Hawash, MechanoidOrange and Greenlandia. Videos explaining things. Mostly over topics like history, geography, economics and science. We believe that the world is a wonderfully fascinating place, and you can find wonder anywhere you look. That is what our videos attempt to convey. Currently, I try my best to release one video every week. Bear with me :) Sources: http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/tcfaq/C5c.html http://www.aoml.noaa.gov/hrd/tcfaq/D7.html http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2016/11/hurricanes-weather-history-nuclear-weapons/ Links to clips that are courtesy of NASA Goddard Scientific Visualization Studios; https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/20207 https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/11925 https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/11269 https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/12701 https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/11123

Ships In Storms Video Compilation [REAL FOOTAGE - HD]

Ships in storms can be so creepy to look at. Just look at those terrifying monster waves from those incredible videos. Those ships in rough seas sure look creepy. I wouldn't want to be in a ship in storm at sea.

Toxicity Comparison (This little will KILL you)

From bee sting to cobra bites, we measure the deadliest substance known to mankind and see how much it takes to kill a person. Everything from the top 10 deadliest substance, most deadly/poisonous animals, plutonium, polonium and even the legendary Type H are listed in this visual animated informative video. Biggest Explosions Comparison: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JFiBXFFzT5c This video is intended for general education and informational purpose only. Music Used: "Oppressive Gloom" - Kevin MacLeod Licensed under CC: By Attribution 3.0 License Information based on LD50, the lethal dose (per person) required to kill half the population of 70kg person within a single dose. Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Median_lethal_dose http://whs.rocklinusd.org/documents/Science/Lethal_Dose_Table.pdf http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/book/9780080122090 http://www.conservationinstitute.org/10-most-poisonous-animals-in-the-world/ Scale of Toxicity App (Halcyon App)

Why Hurricanes Hardly Ever Hit Europe

Hurricane season can be a frightening time for people on and near the east coast of the United States. But in Europe, it's a different story. Europe rarely ever sees full-on hurricanes reach its shores. But that may not always be the case. ------------------------------------------------------ #Hurricanes #Europe Science Insider tells you all you need to know about science: space, medicine, biotech, physiology, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/science Science Insider on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BusinessInsiderScience/ Science Insider on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/science_insider/ Business Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/businessinsider Tech Insider on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider Why Hurricanes Hardly Ever Hit Europe ------------------------------------------------------ Following is a transcript of the video: You don't have to live far inland to avoid hurricanes. Just move to Europe. It rarely sees full-on hurricanes. But that may soon change. Following is a transcript of the video. Europe hasn't had a hurricane reach its shore in over 50 years. Now don't get the wrong idea. Hurricane season still brings a hefty dose of wind and rain. But Europe has something that North America doesn't, when it comes to protection against hurricanes. Location. Hurricanes usually form off the coast of West Africa, where warm water near the Equator and high humidity create columns of rapidly rising rotating air. It's the perfect recipe for a storm. Now the more warm, moist air that the system picks up, the stronger it becomes. That's why a tropical storms can quickly grow into a full on hurricane as it marches across the Atlantic. Now normally hurricanes are propelled on a westward track by the trade winds, caused by the Earth's rotation. That's why Europe as well as the West Coast of the US, rarely experience full on hurricanes. But that's not the whole story. After all, since the year 2000, remnants of around 30 hurricanes have reached Europe. For comparison, Florida has seen 79 real hurricanes over the same time frame. By the time these remnants make landfall, they've went from a hurricane force, to a tropical storm or weaker. And that's where Europe's location comes into play. In order for a hurricane to head towards Europe, something crucial has to happen. It has to travel really far North by about 200 miles. Once a storm system reaches 30 degrees north, it encounters the subtropical jet stream. Which moves in the opposite direction of the trade winds. And therefore, blows the storm East But because the storm is now farther North, the waters underneath are colder by up to about five to 10 degrees Celsius. Which means less energy available to feed the storm. And as a result, it starts to die down by the time it's headed for Europe. Even though it's no longer a hurricane, it still packs a punch when it hits shore. In fact, most of these hurricane remnants will combine with other nearby cyclones and weather fronts, that create high winds and rain that mainly hit Ireland and Great Britain. But have been known to reach as far as Greece or even farther in Northern Russia. Typical damages include power outages, flooding, and occasionally casualties. Most recently the remnants of Hurricane Ophelia made landfall in Ireland and Scotland in 2017. About 50,000 households in Northern Ireland lost power. Three deaths were reported and downed trees closed many of the public roads and highways. This was the worst storm that Ireland had seen in 50 years. And it may be a sign of what's to come. As global surface temperatures rise, it will also increase the sea surface temperatures in the Northern Atlantic. Which researchers estimate could contribute to an increase in the number of hurricane force storms that reach Europe. Some experts predict that by the end of the 21st century, Europe could experience, on average, 13 powerful storms each year during hurricane season. Compared to the two per year it sees now.

Tropical cyclone:
A tropical cyclone is a rapidly rotating storm system characterized by a low-pressure center, a closed low-level atmospheric circulation, strong winds, and a spiral arrangement of thunderstorms that produce heavy rain. Depending on its location and strength, a tropical cyclone is referred to by different names, including hurricane (/ˈhʌrɪkən, -keɪn/), typhoon (/taɪˈfuːn/), tropical storm, cyclonic storm, tropical depression, and simply cyclone.[4] A hurricane is a tropical cyclone that occurs in the Atlantic Ocean and northeastern Pacific Ocean, and a typhoon occurs in the northwestern Pacific Ocean; while in the south Pacific or Indian Ocean, comparable storms are referred to simply as "tropical cyclones" or "severe cyclonic storms".

"Tropical" refers to the geographical origin of these systems, which form almost exclusively over tropical seas. "Cyclone" refers to their winds moving in a circle, whirling round their central clear eye, with their winds blowing counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern Hemisphere. The opposite direction of circulation is due to the Coriolis effect. Tropical cyclones typically form over large bodies of relatively warm water.

The strong rotating winds of a tropical cyclone are a result of the conservation of angular momentum imparted by the Earth's rotation as air flows inwards toward the axis of rotation. As a result, they rarely form within 5° of the equator. Tropical cyclones are almost unknown in the South Atlantic due to a consistently strong wind shear and a weak Intertropical Convergence Zone. Also, the African easterly jet and areas of atmospheric instability which give rise to cyclones in the Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean Sea, along with the Asian monsoon and Western Pacific Warm Pool, are features of the Northern Hemisphere and Australia.




Atlantic hurricane:
An Atlantic hurricane or tropical storm is a tropical cyclone that forms in the Atlantic Ocean, usually in the summer or fall. A hurricane differs from a cyclone or typhoon only on the basis of location.[1] A hurricane is a storm that occurs in the Atlantic Ocean and northeastern Pacific Ocean, a typhoon occurs in the northwestern Pacific Ocean, and a cyclone occurs in the south Pacific or Indian Ocean.

Tropical cyclones can be categorized by intensity. Tropical storms have one-minute maximum sustained winds of at least 39 mph (34 knots, 17 m/s, 63 km/h), while hurricanes have one-minute maximum sustained winds exceeding 74 mph (64 knots, 33 m/s, 119 km/h). Most North Atlantic tropical storms and hurricanes form between June 1 and November 30. The United States National Hurricane Center monitors the basin and issues reports, watches, and warnings about tropical weather systems for the North Atlantic Basin as one of the Regional Specialized Meteorological Centers for tropical cyclones, as defined by the World Meteorological Organization.

In recent times, tropical disturbances that reach tropical storm intensity are named from a predetermined list. Hurricanes that result in significant damage or casualties may have their names retired from the list at the request of the affected nations in order to prevent confusion should a subsequent storm be given the same name. On average, in the North Atlantic basin (from 1966 to 2009) 11.3 named storms occur each season, with an average of 6.2 becoming hurricanes and 2.3 becoming major hurricanes (Category 3 or greater).[6] The climatological peak of activity is around September 11 each season.

INFO : WIKIPEDIA

MUSIC: The Halloween Dawn + Wind sound effect Mixed


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