Tiny Origami apartment in Manhattan unfolds into 4 rooms

Author channel Kirsten Dirksen   7 year ago
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Lego-style apartment transforms into infinite spaces

Christian's hotel inspired by LEGO flat: https://youtu.be/MvJfN9jTS5s When Christian Schallert isn't cooking, dressing, sleeping or eating, his 24 square meter (258 square feet) apartment looks like an empty cube. To use a piece of furniture, he has to build it. Located in Barcelona's hip Born district, the tiny apartment is a remodeled pigeon loft. Designed by architect Barbara Appolloni, Christian says the space was inspired by the space-saving furniture aboard boats, as well as the clean lines of a small Japanese home. Christian sold his apartment and has reinvested his money and small space design ideas in opening a small hotel in Barcelona: www.hotelbrummell.com Christian Schallert, photographer: www.instagram.com/christianschallert Spanish-version tour with architect Barbara Appolloni: http://faircompanies.com/videos/view/un-mini-apartamento-que-se-transforma-en-infinitos-espacios/ Architect Barbara Appolloni: http://www.barbaraappolloni.com/works_christianHouse.html Original story here: http://faircompanies.com/videos/view/lego-style-apartment-transforms-into-infinite-spaces/

Graham Hill's NYC tiny flat #2 attunes L space to the moment

Graham Hill began experimenting with small space living in 2010 when he bought two units in a pre-war coop in New York City’s Soho. He ran a competition to redesign the first rundown flat, and the winners, Romanian architecture students Catalin Sandu and Andrei Butusina, created a moving wall and transformable furniture so the one room could function as three or four. He sold LifeEdited1, or LE1, a few years ago and began work on his second experiment in living with less, LE2, which he hoped would be more affordable and less of a white box. This time he and his team created sliding couch-cubes that can be pushed from room to room to add seating to a couch/dining room or to configure into a queen-sized bed. There’s also lots of felt to absorb sound (both on walls and as a dividing curtain). Ditching LE1’s movable wall - it didn’t block sound and was too expensive - the LifeEdited crew settled for an accordion door (it shrinks to one-tenth it’s expanded size and can fit into tiny closet in the wall). More often found in conference halls or schools, here the expando-wall divides the guest bedroom/office from the rest of the space. “When it's out it has the acoustic properties of a 2-by-4 insulated stud wall with drywall so it's very effective at sound insulation.” LE1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XYV0qATsyts More info on LE2: http://lifeedited.com/lifeedited-2/ LE2 is for sale: https://www.corcoran.com/nyc-real-estate/for-sale/soho-nolita/150-sullivan-street-apt-33/5521991 Original story: https://faircompanies.com/videos/graham-hills-nyc-tiny-flat-2-attunes-l-space-to-the-moment/

LA coliving: PodShare's permeable intersection between social/privacy

Calling it “a social network with an address”, Los Angeles entrepreneur Elvina Beck created PodShare, a coliving experiment where dozens of “Podestrians”- travelers, mobile workers or new arrivals to the city- share a communal space filled with sleeping pods or “bunk beds for adults”. Beck, who built the first PodShare in 2012 with her father, wanted to respond to her demographic’s rejection of widespread home ownership and embrace of the sharing economy. She set out to transform the American bunk bed, creating a more open (and co-ed) version of the Japanese capsule hotels. For $40 to $50 per night (or discounted weekly and monthly prices), Podestrians can choose a bottom or top sleeping pod (equipped with a lamp and a small flatscreen television with Internet access) along with all the shared spaces, including a kitchen (with communal food, and space for individual storage in the pantry and fridge), bathroom, showers (toiletries included) and a communal lounge. Currently, there are 3 locations in Los Angeles, but Beck sees the model as scalable across the country and, similar to a gym, members could have overnight access at any location. PodShare doesn’t own any of the locations, but instead rents empty space from landlords. They stay away from residentially-zoned properties and instead focus on converting commercial or live/work spaces. Beck and her partner Kera Package have evolved the pods so they are now modular and totally mobile so they can go up and down at any location when a lease ends. In reflection of the sharing economy’s privilege of “access” over “ownership”, Beck tries to outfit each location with extras like bicycles and instruments. She hopes each location will eventually have bigger extras, like a gym or pool. Currently, the Hollywood location even has a recording studio and editing bay. PodShare http://podshare.co/ Original story: https://faircompanies.com/videos/la-coliving-a-permeable-intersection-between-socialprivacy/

Tall law student, tiny house: bachelor builds dorm on wheels

When Joel Fleck moved home after college, he wanted his own place, but he didn’t want to pay the steep Sonoma County rents, so he decided to build his own tiny home on a trailer. Inspired by wee house pioneer Jay Shafer (also from Sebastopol), Fleck bought an abandoned trailer from a neighbor for $300 and began building without plans. To make up for his lack of construction experience he “over-engineered” the build, though the entire build cost him just $25,000. He found a lot of salvaged material and this didn’t include the cost of his labor of two years. Many of the details are custom hacks, like the swinging ladder up to his loft crafted from steel cables, chunks of 2 by 4s and “in order to eliminate the swaying I made it so it clips into the floor on these little airline clips”. Fleck is 6’4” so much of the home was custom-built for him. He gave himself just an inch or so clearance in his kitchen and a few inches while sitting in his lofted bedroom. His bathroom is a tighter fit: the shower is just 6’2” so he had to build a special box above it to fit his head. Fleck doesn’t see his 150-square-foot home as a sacrifice, but a right-sized home and study space. Original story: http://faircompanies.com/videos/view/tall-law-student-tiny-house-bachelor-builds-dorm-on-wheels/

Fluid NYC flat uses sliding furniture to create 3 rooms in 1

Russian architect Peter Kostelov and his artist wife, Olga Feshina, wanted private rooms to work from home in their aging New York City apartment so they tore down the interior walls and rebuilt the 700-square-foot space with not just a living room, kitchen, bathroom and master bedroom, but two flex spaces which serve for work and guests (via slide-out beds). With the help of Kostelov’s carpenter father Vladimir (who flew in from Russia to help) they used plywood to craft sliding tables, benches and beds, as well as cabinets, closets and some walls and ceiling finishes. “This is the biggest advantage of plywood: you can make shapes that are custom made… this is how you can save your budget and use as much space as you can." In Peter’s office- a plywood-covered cocoon-, he raised the bed to leave room for a table to slide underneath from the adjacent living room. Crafted from just one four-by-eight piece of plywood, it slides out of the wall and can be adjusted to serve as a table-for-two, dining for 12, a drafting space (for Peter) and fabric-cutting surface (for Olia). The matching plywood benches slide out to match and open for horizontal storage. In the kitchen, there’s a breakfast table that folds down from the brick wall, as well as two plywood cantilevered stools that appear fragile, but hold up to 330 pounds (thanks to the yacht hardware and long anchor pins). Peter's architecture: http://www.kostelov.ru/what/e_house_133.html Olga's art: http://www.olgafeshina.com

In 2005, third-grade-teacher Eric Schneider bought as big as an apartment as he could afford in Manhattan. He paid $235,000 for a 450-square-foot studio with a tiny kitchen.

Then he let architects Michael Chen and Kari Anderson of Normal Projects design a way to pack more density into his small space.

In order to fit more apartment in a small footprint, they created an object that's bigger than furniture, but smaller than architecture and that morphs with the changing activities of a day.

It's a large, blue, oversized cabinet that houses all of the walls/bed/tables/shelving/closets needed for at least 4 full-sized rooms.

By continuing to unfold, or fold differently, Schneider can create a bedroom with accompanying built-in nightstand and closets, but an office plus library, a guest bedroom, and a living room. Or close it up entirely and simply flip down the small bar and the room becomes entertaining space for a dozen.

The Normal Projects architects called their creation the Unfolding Apartment, though given Schneider's affinity for the Japanese sense of space (he spent his first year post-college living and teaching in Japan), it could as easily be called the Origami Apartment.

In total, Schneider spent $70,000 total remodeling his new apartment and this includes not just the cabinet, but the bathroom renovation, all cabinetry, kitchen appliances, furniture and dishes.

In this video, Chen shows us his custom cabinet of rooms and Schneider unfolds a few of his favorite configurations: his bedroom (& closet/changing room), office (& library), guest bedroom, kitchen, dining bar, living room and lounge.

Normal Projects/Michael Chen Architecture: http://www.normalprojects.com/

Original story here: http://faircompanies.com/videos/view/tiny-origami-apartment-in-manhattan-unfolds-into-4-rooms/

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